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Human rights (in connection with health care)

Health inequalities of the Roma in Europe: a literature review.
Author(s): Parekh N, Rose T
Abstract:

The Roma are the most populous marginalised community in Europe and have some of the greatest health needs. There is a higher prevalence of communicable and non-communicable diseases within the community and significantly shorter life expectancies than national averages.

Health needs of the Roma population in the Czech and Slovak Republics
Author(s): Koupilová I, Epstein H, Holčı́k J, Hajioff S, McKee M
Health needs of the Roma population in the Czech and Slovak Republics.
Author(s): Koupilová I, Epstein H, Holčík J, Hajioff S, McKee M
Abstract:

In the growing literature on the human rights of Roma people in Central Europe, their relatively poor health status is often mentioned. However, little concrete information exists about the contemporary health status of the Roma in this region. We sought information on the health of the Roma in two of countries with significant Roma minorities, the Czech and Slovak Republics, by means of systematic searches for literature on the health of Roma people published in Czech or Slovak or by authors from the two countries.

Health status of Roma women in Spain
Author(s): Pilar Carrasco-Garrido, Ana López de Andrés, Valentin Hernández Barrera, Isabel Jiménez-Trujillo, Rodrigo Jiménez-García
Abstract:

The objective of the present study is to describe the health status of Roma women in Spain. Population-based health data have become available for this group, and we can now identify differences with non-Roma women.

IMPROVING ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE OF ROMA COMMUNITY IN VALJEVO
Author(s): Tanja Dimitrijević
Abstract:

Issues concerning health of Roma have not often been the subject of research in Serbia, despite the fact that the data on life quality of the majority of this ethnic group indicate that living conditions of majority of Roma largely cause and perpetuate their health problems. 

Left Out: Roma and Access to Health Care in Eastern and South Eastern Europe
Author(s): Open Society Institute
Abstract:

For the millions of Roma living in Central and Eastern Europe1 and South Eastern Europe,2 persistent discrimination and marginaliza- tion are a daily reality that results in poorer health for individuals and communi- ties. Roma3 make up the largest ethnic minority in these countries with an overall population estimated at 5 to 6 million people.4 Available data consistently shows higher rates of illness and mortality among Roma than in majority populations. Access to health care is only one factor shaping overall health, but it is critical to increasing social inclusion of Roma and ensuring equal opportunities for all. 

Policies to improve the health and well-being of Roma people: the European experience.
Author(s): Fésüs G, Östlin P, McKee M, Ádány R
Abstract:

The Roma constitute the largest ethnic minority in the European Region. The many policy initiatives designed over the past two decades to tackle their adverse social conditions in Central and South Eastern Europe, where the Roma population is concentrated, have had limited success. This paper reviews what is being done to improve the health and social situation of Roma communities in the Region and identifies factors that may limit the effectiveness of these policy initiatives. Strong political commitment, measures to overcome prejudices against Roma, inter-sectoral policy coordination, adequate budgets, evidence-based policies, and Roma involvement can be identified as key preconditions for improved healthoutcomes and well-being. However, developing a sound evidence-based approach to Roma inclusion requires removing obstacles to the collection of reliable data and improving analytical and evaluation capacity. Health policies seeking to reduce health inequalities for Roma people need to be aligned with education, economic, labour market, housing, environmental and territorial development policies and form part of comprehensive policy frameworks allowing for effective integration.

Primary care for the Roma in Europe: Position paper of the European forum for primary care
Author(s): Pim de Graaf, Danica Rotar Pavlič, Erika Zelko, Marga Vintges, Sara Willems, Lise Hanssens
Abstract:

Roma populations’ low health status and limited access to health services, including primary care, has been documented in many European countries, and warrants specific health policies and practices. A variety of experiences shows how primary care can adjust its practices to reduce the barriers to primary care for Roma populations.

At local level, establishing collaboration with Roma organisations helps primary care to improve mutual relations and quality of care. Mediation has proved to be an effective tool. Skills training of primary care practitioners may enhance their individual competences. Research and international sharing of experiences are further tools to improve primary care for the Roma people.

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